Remaining Financially Responsible while Prepping

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Let’s face it, prepping can be expensive. Anyone who has been prepping for at least, oh, ten seconds or so, has had to fact that reality. With most of us living from paycheck to paycheck anyway, its’ hard to come up with the money we need, in order to prepared.

In today’s modern society, the answer to that is to just buy it on credit. But that’s not the answer we want. Buying on credit might solve the problem for the moment, but only by creating the potential for a bigger problem in the future. Somehow we’re going to have to pay that credit card off, and there’s no way of knowing whether or not we’re going to have the money to do so.

The biggest risk with dept is in the event of a financial collapse. The people who have the hardest time surviving such a calamity are those who are in debt. Not only do they not have the money to pay off their existing debt, they have very few options in doing anything to restructure their debt. That generally leads to losing cars, other things bought on credit and ultimately, to losing homes.

Okay, so how do we keep from becoming those people?

First of all, don’t get freaked out by the overwhelming need to do everything to prepared for a disaster RIGHT NOW! We all felt that at the beginning and mostly it led to a lot of mistakes. Prepping is a process, not a goal. Wherever you are in your prepping process, each and every thing you do will increase your preparedness and your family’s chances of survival. That’s the point.

Set yourself a prepping budget and stick to it, even if that’s only $5.00 per week. Those five dollars works out to $260 per year. You’ll be amazed what you can buy with that, if you buy judiciously. It might not be what you want to buy; but we’re talking survival here, not living on the Ritz.

I add every windfall I get to that, regardless of what they are or where they came from. Adding to my prepping stockpile or being able to buy the gear that I need, is much more important than getting a larger television; besides, I’m satisfied with the television I’ve got.

The next thing to do is to look for bargains. Rather than trying to buy the latest survival gadget out there, look for other things which will do the same job. You many never even need all that gear, especially if you’re basic plan is to bug in, rather than bug out. So it doesn’t make sense to go broke buying things just because of good advertising.

Focus on your priorities; basically, the priorities you need to have, in order to survive. While it might be fun to buy a new gun, that’s really not your number one priority. I’m not saying don’t get the gun, just make sure you do it when it makes sense to do so, financially speaking.

Finally, work on your finances, especially your debt. Too many preppers are living with the idea that our dept will simply disappear if there’s every a major disaster. But there’s nothing in the history of disasters that says that your debt will go away in the event of a disaster. If it does, it’s probably going to be because your house isn’t there anymore.

Adding the loss of your home, to whatever else you are suffering in the wake of a disaster, isn’t going to help you and your family. Rather, being the ones who have ensured that you will have a place to live, while other people are being put out of their homes. Considering the importance of good shelter in survival, that’s enough of a reason, all by itself, to make sure that you do everything you can to eliminate debt.